In business settings, it’s really easy to forget to take the time to say Thank-You, and yet, it’s an important part of interaction with others. It’s important to people that they feel valid, important, and respected. Just as saying sorry matters, so too does remembering to thank those who help you move forward. Here are some tips and ideas:

  • Email is nice; a personal card is better- It’s really easy to send email. I just sent a thank-you that way, and that’s what prompted me to post this. And yet, looking back, I think it’s much nicer to send along a physical card. A personal note written by your own hand inside matters far more than a few lines of type into a window that’s so easily available at your fingertips. It shows you care enough to take an extra step.
  • Write specifically- We’ve all done it: we get a gift from someone around the holidays or our birthday but we forget who sent what, so we send out that generic “Thanks very much for the gift.” People know. They feel a little less special when you’ve sent a generic reply. I find that people respond really well to targeted responses. “Thanks for the copy of IMPROV WISDOM. I really look forward to reading it, and look forward to discussing it with you when we talk next.” That’s simple, brief, and targeted.
  • Use nice cards and a nice pen- If you’re going to go this route, put in the extra few minutes to purchase nice notecards and use a pen that gives you decent flow. You don’t have to break the bank to still give a professional and yet personal presence via the thank-you note you select and the ink you use to sign it. And, just like attractive-looking people don’t always have a great voice for radio, an expensive pen isn’t always the best flowing pen. Read up on pens and their value on sites like PigPog, where Michael is nigh obsessed with quality writing materials.
  • In person- Make sure you say thank-you to people face to face when you have the opportunity. The same “content” applies. Be brief, be specific, and be warm about it. Say so in an unhurried way, looking into the person’s eyes. It is not enough to just say the words, or at least it won’t have the same effect. Don’t make it into a miniseries TV moment, but do try to make sure the person senses how imporant their contribution to your life really was.

I won’t belabor the point more than this. Thank the people in your life who add value, and make sure you spread a little good karma that way. Be kind and generous in your thanks, and the results will almost always be favorable.

–Chris Brogan is very thankful for the opportunity to write for you. He’d send out personal cards to you all, but you forgot to give him your address. Stop by [chrisbrogan.com] and say hi.

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