OneNote 12 has been released as beta, and there are already users on it. By default, OneNote is a note taking software. Larry O’Brien pushes it to the next level where he uses it as his GTD platform. With the instructions that he gives, I think this is a pretty good implementation:

To do this, you have to customize your OneNote flags, a simple process that is marred only by the fact that instead of acting on the underlying notebook (which you’ll share between computers, as we’ll discuss later), customization is on a per-machine basis. So you have to perform this process on every machine.

In “GTD” every multistep task is a “project,” every single task is an “action,” and the next physical action you need to do is the “next action.” The heart of GTD is breaking projects down into actions and next actions, so that your to-do list is a set of achievable tasks “Buy 10 pounds of nails at Home Depot” rather than overwhelming things like “Build the house.”

Additionally, I break down my projects into 3 categories: “Urgent” projects on which I should be concentrating, “Ongoing” projects, and “Deferred” projects (some people call these “Fallow” projects).

With that in mind, I customize my note flags. I use open checkboxes for actions, and starred checkboxes to indicate projects. I use green, blue, and yellow to indicate urgent, ongoing, and deferred categories

Remember, you can get a copy of your OneNote 12 Beta 2through Microsoft for free in the testing period – download it here.

Getting Things Done With OneNote 12 – [Knowing.Net]

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