On the topic of presentation, we have talked a lot about how to use visual presentation aid such as powerpoint to assist your presentation – what you should, or shouldn’t do. Come to think of it, they are pretty good, but they are not extensive enough compared to the piece I am going to introduce. Over at sooper powerpointless, they have a great link to Till Voswinckel’s thesis on Presentational Visualisation: Towards An Imagery-based Approach Of Presentation Visuals. It talks about how existing presentation computing software endorse the bullet point slide schema and it became the most dominant format for presentation. He agures that research has proven its ineffectiveness in the learner’s perspective. Instead the pure visual imagery is proven to be effective for both learning and persuasion strategies. Here is the clip of the abstract:

… However, despite the well-established need for cognition, comprehension, and persuasion in any such presentational scenario, cognitive psychology and advertisement research have in fact substantiated previously voiced critique on the “intellectual reductionism” (Cyphert 2004) and communicative ineptitude of these “bulleted approaches” from an educational, “learner’s perspective”. In fact, experimental evidence from dual-coding psychologists particularly found the aforementioned, text-centric visualisation approaches “ineffective” within our initially defined, “narrated” presentation scenario: Instead of enhancing an orally delivered speech, simultaneous text display actually “exceeds the cognitive capacity of most people” (Raymond
2003), not leastly since suchlike, visual-verbal processing would essentially represent something of a “processing challenge” to the human, cognitive system (Mayer, 2001).

Alternatively, the use of purely visual imagery has been proven effective not merely in terms of “spatial reasoning”, but moreover as an operative approach to learning and persuasion strategies. Based on mental, vi– sual imagery and picture superiority assumptions (Paivio 1986) now generally “agreed on” within the cognitive-scientific community (Kosslyn 1994), visualisation theory has recognized and leveraged the communicative potential of such pictorial approaches for some time now (Crapo et al. 2000, Barkowsky 2002)…

The format of the thesis document is pretty attractive too…

Presentational Visualisation | Towards An Imagery-based Approach Of Presentation Visuals – [sooper via Presentation Zen]

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