Measure Tape

The following numbers track the increase in obesity in children from 1963-2002 by percent.

  • 1963-1965 4.2%
  • 1976-1980 6.5%
  • 1999-2002 25.8%

Here are some more facts for adults. Many of the statistics come from U.S. data bases others are taken from the World Health Organization.

  • 24.1% of men aged 20-34 are obese
  • 25.2% of men aged 35-44 are obese
  • 30.1% of men aged 45-54 are obese
  • 32.9% of men aged 55-64 are obese
  • 33.4% of men aged 65-74 are obese
  • 20.4% of men aged over 75 are obese
  • 25.8% of women aged 20-34 are obese
  • 33.9% of women aged 35-44 are obese
  • 38.1% of women aged 45-54 are obese
  • 43.1% of women aged 55-64 are obese
  • 38.8% of women aged 65-74 are obese
  • 25.1% of women aged over 75 are obese

Is all hope lost? No, not really here are some steps recommended by health and fitness experts.

Whip out the tape measure. If you are a female and your waist is 35 inches or greater, you’re at risk for obesity. If you a male with a 40 inch or greater measurement you face the same risk. Don’t measure your kids. If you’re at risk they may be also.

Grab a notebook. List everything every member of your family eats and decide whether it meets your goals for nutrition.

Make some changes. Adjust the way you spend time. Take the kid outside and throw the ball around.

Portion out your screen time. Whether at the television or the computer set a time limit on you screen time and stick to it.

Read a book. Find a good health guide and read it. It will help you incorporate it into your thought process.

Park and walk. When you go to the market, park way out at the end of the lot and walk in. You’ll probably get less dings on your car too.

Keep an activity log. Record the amount of exercise you get and try to increase it by a few minutes each day.

Eat at the table. Avoid the television at meal time. Watching TV while you eat increases your chance of over eating.

Snack right. Throw a big bowl of carrots, celery, and other raw munchies in the fridge.

Reg Adkins writes on behavior and the human experience at (elementaltruths.blogspot.com).

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