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Published: December 14, 2016

Hyperhidrosis Treatment Options

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Excessive sweating, or hyperhidrosis, is a medical condition in which an individual sweats uncontrollably and erratically. Individuals diagnosed with this malady might sweat at any time, even if the temperature is cold, or when they are at rest.

Sweating is a vital process helping the body to remain cool, and is an entirely natural response to rising body temperature. Generally people tend to sweat a lot in warm temperatures, after they exercise, or when feeling nervous, anxious, angry, embarrassed, or afraid.

On the opposite hand, excessive sweating happens without such triggers. Individuals experiencing hyperhidrosis are have over-active sweat glands which they cannot manage efficiently. This uncontrollable sweating typically results in both physical and emotional discomfort.

Therapy for hyperhidrosis is available, and usually begins at your primary physician’s office. Both topical and systemic medications have been employed in the treatment of hyperhidrosis. Other treatments alternatives for hyperhidrosis include iontophoresis and botulinum toxin injections.

 Primary hyperhidrosis

Being diagnosed with primary hyperhidrosis means hands, feet, armpits, and the groin space are among the foremost active regions of perspiration because of the high variety of sweat glands in these areas. Once excessive sweating is localized to a particular space, it’s cited as primary hyperhidrosis or focal hyperhidrosis.

Secondary hyperhidrosis.

When sweating happens as a result of another medical condition, it’s diagnosed as secondary hyperhidrosis. In such cases, there are no rules and no specific affected areas of the body. The sweating may occur in one space, or it is everywhere the body. Typical conditions that cause secondary hyperhidrosis include:

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1. Cancer
2. Heart conditions
3. Hyperthyroidism
4. Menopause
5. Spinal cord injury
6. Stroke

This condition is presently considered incurable. But, over the years, researchers have discovered varied treatments that may facilitate and even fully stop excessive sweating.

1. Antiperspirants

This is almost always the primary step for anyone plagued by excessive sweating. The science behind it says that strong antiperspirants ought to be able to management underarm sweating by plugging up the sweat glands. However, the reality is that this methodology is commonly ineffective, can cause skin irritation, and can mark your clothing. One benefit, though, is not having to worry about body odor!

2. Iontophoresis

This procedure is primarily used for hands and feet. The idea behind small iodization current is that it will stop the sweat from rising to the skin’s surface. Hands and feet are placed into a shallow receptacle filled with water, and a small current is run through the liquid. A typical session lasts about twenty minutes to a half-hour, and treatment will include multiple sessions. Some side effects noted are cracking skin and occasional blisters.

3. Botox

Botulinum toxin type A is usually used to treat underarm sweating. The thought behind this treatment is that Botox can forestall the discharge of the chemical that signals the sweat glands to activate. It has been shown to be effective within the underarm space, but comes with painful injections and the potential for flu-like symptoms throughout this treatment.

4. Medication

Pharmaceuticals offer a variety of treatments, generally through sweat gland stimulation interference. They’re generally used when previously mentioned treatments cannot be applied. Anticholinergics, beta blockers, and benzodiazepines are most conventional varieties. Each type has its own benefits and chance of side effects, so these are not effective treatments for everyone.

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5. Lifestyle changes

Some lifestyle changes may not provide an actual cure for the condition, but may help to reduce symptoms, such as:

1. Sidestepping triggers that you know make your sweating complicated, such as spicy foods and alcohol.

2. Using antiperspirant frequently, rather than deodorant.

3. Avoiding wearing tight, restrictive clothing and artificial fibers, such as nylon.

Surgery

In very extreme cases, surgery may provide a last-resort alternative to hyperhidrosis treatments.

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