Maybe you’re a new homeowner.

Maybe your city’s police captain has warned of a string of recent break-ins.

Or, maybe you’ve just binge-watched an entire season of Criminal Minds on Netflix.

In any case, you’re putting serious thought into installing a security system to keep your family safe.

The problem is: you know a lot goes into installing a security system in your home, and you don’t know where to begin.

Fear not! This guide will help you understand everything you need to know before you even start looking for the system that will best suit your needs and help keep your family safe.

Know what you need

The knee-jerk reaction, of course, is to go all out – especially when it comes to the safety of your kids and loved ones. But, as with all things, flashiest isn’t always best. Of course, if you go into a home security store with a look that says you’re frightened to death of potential catastrophe, the employee working with you is most likely going to try to sell you as much as possible – regardless of whether or not it suits your purposes or not.

It’s one thing to not know specifics, but you should definitely have a general idea of what you’re looking for. Understand the difference between a sensor and an alarm. Know the type of camera you need. Do some research on how much a system and installation should cost.

By showing the salesperson you are knowledgeable about home security systems, you’ll avoid getting ripped off, and end up with the best system your money can buy.

Be thorough

Too often, criminals get into homes because a certain entry point was overlooked by the homeowner.

When preparing to install a security system into your home, you have to think like a burglar. Look for areas that offer even the slightest opportunity for a break-in – such as the sliding door in the basement being held shut by a block of wood, or the tree located directly outside the upstairs guestroom window.

Think about it: If someone is desperate enough to break into a house, they’re likely to do it by any means necessary, right?

Make sure you cover all the bases and ensure your home is as secure as possible.

Leave potential for upgrades

This piece of advice mainly pertains to those looking to install a security system on their own.

Take into consideration the fact that you might one day add a new room or area to your home that would require a bit of fine tuning to your system.

Similarly, one of your devices may start to fail over time, or the company may release a better-performing device. If your system is put together piecemeal, you shouldn’t have a problem changing out obsolete technology in favor of the newest iteration.

And, perhaps the best part of a DIY system is you can take it with you if you decide to move. Obviously, you might have to do a little revamping of your system when you move into your new digs, but at least you won’t have had to leave your entire system behind.

Keep everyone in the loop

You can just imagine it, right?

You settle in for a good night’s sleep, and start to doze off. Suddenly, the alarm starts blaring, warning you of an intruder.

You reach for your phone to call the cops in a complete panic, only to realize your college-age son – home from a night out with friends – has forgotten the passcode.

Once you install a security system, you should always make sure your loved ones know how to disarm it if need be. This should extend to family, friends, and anyone else you trust to be in your home without having to check with you first.

Furthermore, just because you have a security system doesn’t mean you’re 100% safe. Prepare a failsafe plan in case everyone in the house needs to act quickly, so everyone knows what to do in case a true emergency strikes.
________

A home security system can end up saving your life, and the lives of your loved ones. With proper research, you can be sure to get the best one you can possibly afford, and keep your family safe in the process.

Featured photo credit: Security Camera / CWCS Managed Hosting / Flickr via farm8.staticflickr.com

Love this article?

Read full content