No matter what time of year it is, there’s a pretty good chance you’re using more energy than you need to be using on a daily basis. Through winter, spring, summer, and fall, there are many different tweaks you can make to your home to reduce your energy usage, and save some money in the process. While many of these energy-saving methods overlap throughout the seasons, most target a specific time of year in which they will be most useful.

Saving Energy in Winter

Most people’s energy usage spikes throughout the winter months. The cold, snowy weather, coupled with early darkness, means heat and lighting will be used throughout the majority of each day. While there isn’t much you can do to get around using your heat and lights more than you would during other times of the year, there are many ways you can ensure you’re using this energy to its maximum potential during the winter.

No matter how cold it gets, keep your thermostat programmed to a warm 68°F. This level of temperature will keep you comfortable and not put excess stress on your heating system. In turn, you won’t see a spike in your heating bill—it should remain fairly constant, even throughout the coldest weeks of the year.

Be sure to clean, maintain, or replace your furnace filter as necessary. A blocked-up filter will also result in a stressed-out heater, and an increased bill. Not only that, but if warm air is being blocked by a clogged filter, you air you do get won’t be nearly as warm as you’d like (which will likely result in you turning up the heat, and wasting more energy and money).

Check the areas in which your house comes into contact with the outside. This includes windows, doors, and your plumbing system. Ensure the space between the inside and outside is completely sealed so warm air can’t escape. Again, if you’re losing warm air in any way, you’ll end up turning up the heat. Don’t take the easy way out; check the seals around your home and keep the warm air in.

Saving Energy in the Summer

The summer months are a great time to save energy. Though it may get incredibly hot in your area of the world, it’s much easier to deal with heat than with extreme cold—at least in terms of energy usage.

If you use an air conditioner or central air system (for which I don’t blame you!), again make sure your filters are clean and your windows and openings are sealed. Like using the heat during the winter, clogged filters and open seals will mean your cooling system will be working overtime—which will lead to much larger bills for you each month.

There are other, less obvious ways to stretch your energy usage throughout the summer months, too. When possible, give your clothes dryer and dishwasher a break; use a clothesline when the sun is out to dry your clothes, and use a simple drying rack rather than relying on your dishwasher’s drying cycle. You likely don’t need your clothes or dishes right away, so let the naturally warm air do its thing for you, free of charge.

You might notice your refrigerator works overtime in the summer months, as well. You can combat this by stocking it as much as possible. Think about it: the smaller the amount of space, the less it has to work. It’s why I don’t mind living in a small apartment rather than a gigantic mansion (or at least that’s what I tell myself!).

Saving Energy in Spring and Fall

The transitional periods of the year, spring and fall, are actually the times in which you should be most diligent about your energy usage. Since the temperature can fluctuate from day to day during these times of year, you shouldn’t rely on an automated thermostat; it will likely waste more energy starting up and turning off throughout the day than it’s actually worth. Instead, play it by ear: open or close your windows depending on your preference rather than using excess energy.

These transition periods are a good time to prepare for the extreme hot or cold weather ahead. Do all the maintenance discussed above (filters, seals, etc.) while the weather is comfortable, so you’re not scrambling to improve your situation in the dead of summer or winter. Think ahead, and you’ll be sure to stay comfortable year-round.

Featured photo credit: 2 / Stanley Zimny via farm2.staticflickr.com

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